The Grid

The Grid—A training field intended to emulate challenging sporting clays targets

Many gun clubs today have multiple clay target venues, such as skeet, trap and sporting clays. The larger clubs may have additional venues such as Olympic/Bunker Trap, Helice, 5-Stand and possibly even Powder Pigeon.

Practicing and Competing with the .410 Bore

The .410 bore, commonly referred to as the little gun, has been a source of much discussion relative to how much practice one should do with it and one’s attitudes towards shooting it in competition. Let’s put it this way: some people like to shoot it and some people don’t for an assortment of reasons.

The question I am going to try to answer in this article is what the attitude towards the little gun really is; and if some of the more prominent names in skeet practice with it as much as they do other guns, and if so, why?

The Cosmic Cowboys

I began shooting registered skeet in 1989, and the Cosmic Cowboys had already made their mark and gone their separate ways by the time I started.

On the 40th anniversary of the inception of the Cosmic Cowboys, it seems only fitting we travel back in time and recall the famous five and recap a little about who they were and what they accomplished.

Skeet Hoopla

Clay target shooting has many disciplines. Among them are American Skeet, International Skeet, ATA, PITA and Olympic Trap, Helice, Sporting Clays, Crazy Quail, Powder Pigeon and others. People who shoot these various disciplines do so because they like the way the various games are played. I believe their preferences stem from the unpredictability of the target presentations while others emulate hunting situations.

Hold Points

Writing articles for Shotgun Sports has made me pretty introspective about my own shooting. I started off my 2014 Skeet Shooting season in San Antonio at The Blaser Skeet Classic. Unlike years past, I did not shoot well, and I struggled to figure out why. I began to try to put together the rationale for my poor performance.